Shinpyu

In Buddhist cultures,  men are expected to enter the monastery at least once in their lifetimes. For young boys, this is accompanied with a party and finally a procession around the main temples. Called, shinpyu, it is a feast for the eyes as the young boys are dressed in beautiful costumes snd wear make-up. For girls, it’s also the time for them to get ear piercings.

I caught a shinpyu twice on separate occasions  at the Mahamuni Paya in Mandalay.

The festivities began even on the way to the temple as the convoy of pick-ups loaded with the boys and girls and their families are accompanied by much music and even dancing.

Upon arriving  at Mahamuni Paya, a processinal line was formed.

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Behind the girls and boys are their proud families.

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Also in the procession are young women holding symbolic objects. There are strict requirements to be one of these women. Their parents, for example, should still be alive and married.

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At the rear of the procession are women bearing gifts such as blankets to the monks.

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The children go to the buddha inside the temple to bow in devotion.

It takes a lot of money to host a ceremony this grand. Less financially  capable families simply bring gifts to the monks.

It was fascinating to watch as the children were so cute.

A formal picture.

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Boys are heavily made-up.

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They are dressed to look like the princes of old.

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The little  girls are in white.

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Colorful umbrellas  shield the children from the sun.

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Categories: Myanmar | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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